How To Cope When You're The Only Vegan In Your House

 

Boyfriend, wife, kids, parents or friends - spending your life with people who don’t share your values or actions can be hard. When we are enthusiastic about a lifestyle, it is only natural to want to share this with the people we love and spend time with. It’s not so easy being the odd one out, and realising that our passion and enthusiasm isn’t quite matched by those around us. So what to do when you’re the only vegan in the house, to not only cope with the challenges, but to thrive? Read below for some of my tips.

 

Let them know

First of all, it’s important to explain to people why you have chosen this lifestyle, and what it means for you. Sometimes, we expect people to know what Veganism means. Though some people really don’t understand how it really looks in practise. They may have heard something like ‘vegans don’t eat meat’, and their definition of meat is ‘red meat’, therefore, cook you fish for dinner. It’s not just that - some restaurants, friends, families, or restaurant staff are well meaning, and unknowing. Some will also think it is only about what you eat. So if you’re sharing a life, house, or fridge, with people who aren’t vegan you may need to clearly express to them how your lifestyle is different from theirs. It can also be helpful to share your favourite brands, products, and of course - Buddy Scrub product with your loved ones, so that come holidays and birthdays they will be able to give you gifts that are aligned with your lifestyle.

 

Share Your Passion

There are so many ways to feel connected to those you live with, whilst staying strong in your beliefs and understanding of others. There is a big difference between lecturing our loved ones, and sharing some interesting information. Knowing how to find the balance with sharing information is key to helping people in your life better understand the vegan lifestyle.

Rather than demand that all members eat the same as you, or begin to tell them how their meal is not ethical or compassionate, why not gently share your efforts by offering to cook for the whole house once (or more!) a week? Offer from a place of genuinely wanting to share and nourish them, and stay humble through the process. They will see - and taste - for themselves, how delicious and accessible this lifestyle can be. They don’t need to convert, or even hear why the meal is ethical and cruelty free - and sometimes they may just ask themselves! When something is shoved down out throats (literally and figuratively) then they may be far less likely to want to absorb the information and be open to it. You may find that the less ‘intense’ you are about trying to convert your family in particular, the more curious they may be on their own to ask about your lifestyle and reasons.

If you can, offer to buy some more groceries for the house, stocking up full of vegan products and ingredients. Explaining how to use these products and how to cook with the ingredients is a way to include others in your lifestyle. They may even like that vegan cheese more than the dairy!

 

Have a sense of humour

People like to tease, annoy, and make jokes. Maybe your family is super supportive and happy for you, or maybe some remarks get to you and leave you feeling disconnected and frustrated. Remember, not everyone will understand your decision, and not everyone is where you are at with their values. Maybe one day… but for now, try to keep a sense of humour and not take others so seriously when they make comments about your choices. You can stay strong and steady with your own boundaries, without having to get defensive or senstitive about their comments. Often people’s comments and jokes come from a lack of understanding about Veganism. Staying strong in these moments helps to ensure that your compassionate energy remains strong.

 

Stay Informed

If you are newly transitioning, or unsure o f which items in your household are suited to your lifestyle, make sure you keep yourself informed by looking up information online. When it comes to nutrition, there is a great amount of resources about nutrient sources, vitamins and minerals and everything you need to know and consume. This will also keep you prepared when you’re asked the question you’ll probably hear countless times in your life: ‘where do you get your protein?!’

 

Keep Snacks

Vegan snacks can be delicious. Bliss balls, exotic fruits, nuts, granola, crackers, and so much more. So delicious that others may want to nibble on them too! Make sure you are clear in what is yours, and whether you are up for sharing or not. You can even suggest replacing their cheese dips with hummus if they really like it, and help the whole household in the process! Otherwise, respect their snacks, and ask for respect for yours.

 

Compassion is Key

Know that we are all on our own journey, and if being compassionate and giving more love is one of your values and reasons for living a vegan lifestyle, then it only makes sense to treat all others - no matter their lifestyle - with compassion and love. Though it can be easy to get stuck in feelings of helplessness and sadness when we see injustice and a lack of understanding, know that you can contribute your knowledge and action to helping to create changes in yours and others lives, whilst still staying open and inclusive of everyone. Stay confident in your choices, and you may see others having more confidence in your choices as well.

 

Join a group

If you find that you’re continuing to feel isolated as a vegan in your household, then there are many ways to connect with others who have a vegan lifestyle. There are many communities that you can join, such as Instagram pages, Facebook groups, groups via meetup.com.au or attending vegan community events in your city. Connecting with people who have a similar lifestyle and values to you, will help you to feel less isolated and perhaps even make some new friends.

 

 

For more tips:

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/lifestyle/how-to-survive-as-a-vegan-in-a-non-vegan-household

https://www.plantbuilt.com/vegan-understanding-everyone-understands/

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Cruelty Free is not the same as Vegan and here's why!

 


In the beauty community, it’s quite common for the words “cruelty-free” and “vegan” to be used interchangeably. However, this can be a problem because the two actually have completely different meanings.

For example, just because something is cruelty-free does not mean it’s vegan! It can be confusing at first, but once you know the difference between the two, you won’t forget. Here are some reasons why these two labels have completely different meanings and why my natural, vegan and cruelty free skincare products are the choice for you.

Requirements for Cruelty-Free Products

In order for an item to be considered cruelty-free, it has to be free of all animal testing. This includes testing on the finished physical product itself, as well as all of the individual ingredients.

Many beauty and cosmetics companies still use animal testing to see if their products are safe for human use, but it’s completely unnecessary and can be extremely cruel on the animals. During the testing process; animals such as mice, rabbits, and beagles are applied with products and ingredients to complete irritation and toxicity tests, many of which injure the animals for life or worse - kill them.

Cosmetic companies can rub products (such as mascara) directly into animal’s eyes or skin to see how they react to it. They can also shave their skin and expose them to toxic levels of products to see whether there are any adverse reactions.

If you don’t want to support this cruel practice, all you need to do is look for the cruelty-free label or cruelty free statement on products! There are many skincare companies that display cruelty free specific logos or clearly state that the product is cruelty free – you will see this statement on all of my natural skincare products.

Just because a product doesn't have a logo, it doesn't mean it’s not cruelty-free. Some companies use words instead, with a statement on the product such as ‘cruelty free’, ‘never tested on animals’ or similar.

However, if there is no statement or logo about cruelty free or animal testing, it may be safe to assume that the product was likely tested on innocent animals.

 

If it’s Cruelty-Free, doesn’t that automatically make it Vegan?

There is a common misconception that if a product is cruelty free, then it is automatically vegan. Many people think that just because something isn't tested on animals, that makes it vegan.

Unfortunately, this isn't true. Even though a product might not have been tested on animals, it could still have non-vegan ingredients in it that are derived from animals.

These ingredients might be obvious, or they might be hidden in words that many people wouldn't assume to be a non-vegan ingredient and this is why it’s important to check ingredient labels for any potential ingredients that are animal derived.

Examples of Non-Vegan Ingredients

Here are the most common non-vegan ingredients that are used in cosmetics, even in cruelty-free ones:

  • Carmine/ Cochineal - a red dye made from crushed beetles
  • Honey – a by product of bees
  • Beeswax - a by product of bees
  • Lanolin - derived from sheep’s wool
  • Tallow - rendered form of beef fat
  • Gelatin - ground up hooves, bones, etc
  • Glycerin - animal fats, although it can be vegetable derived
  • Keratin - a type of animal protein
  • Collagen – derived from animals and used due to its plumping effects


Requirements for Vegan Products

In order for a product to be considered vegan, it must be cruelty-free and have vegan ingredients.

Many companies are making the step to ensure their products are cruelty free, however they are unfortunately not taking the additional step to omit animal by-products from their ingredients and move towards vegan products. The well-being of animals is extremely important at Buddy Scrub and that’s why my skincare products are created to be both cruelty free and vegan so that you can always rest assured that no animals are involved or harmed.

What to Look For

When searching for cruelty-free and vegan cosmetics, the easiest thing to do is look for clear statements or the associated logos and can be on the front or back of a product.  The logos for cruelty free often include a rabbit and are associated with specific cruelty free organisations, and the vegan logos will often look like a ‘V’.

If you’re not able to find logos, then look for statements or check the ingredients list to make sure there are no animal derivates. All of my skincare products are labeled as natural, cruelty free and vegan friendly so that you know you’re making the right choice as soon as you pick me up.

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Now that you have a better understanding of the difference between the words “cruelty-free” and “vegan”, you’ll be able to make more informed decisions in regards to your cosmetics and skincare. Hopefully, companies will move towards making their products both cruelty-free and vegan; but my range of cleansers, body scrubs, moisturisers and lip care have you covered!

Shop our extensive range of natural, cruelty free and vegan friendly products here.

 

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What does it mean to become Vegan?

Cattle Farm

 

You may have been hearing more and more about the vegan movement over the past 12 months due to an increasing interest in this way of life. But what does it actually mean to be vegan?

The word vegan refers to people who consume no animal meat or by-products (such as eggs or dairy) and avoid any animal derived clothing, accessories, skincare and more. The word vegan was initially used in 1944 by Donald Watson who was a non-dairy vegetarian and settled on the first three letters and last two letters of vegetarian – ‘vegan’, to separate this way of life from vegetarianism.  

Below are some of the common food or products that Vegans avoid:

  • All animal meat – red meat, poultry, seafood, game meat etc
  • All animal by-products – dairy, eggs, lanolin (oil from sheep’s wool), honey, caviar, beeswax, whey protein powder
  • All animal skins – leather, fur, reptile skin, feathers, wool
  • Animal derived products – goose down jackets/bedding, sheep skin ugg boots, silk clothing/bedding, pearls, ivory, feathered accessories, goat’s milk skincare, makeup using animal products like carmine.
  • Animals for entertainment/experimentation – circus’ with animal acts, zoos, sea life parks, travelling animal acts, purchasing of exotic animals as pets, animal testing, factory farm pet breeding, rodeos, horse/dog racing.

This list is not extensive, however it gives you an overview of the ways in which animals are used and exploited for the human population and how adopting a vegan lifestyle can aid in reducing the harm, torture and pain that comes to these animals.

So why do people become vegan? People can decide to become vegan for several reasons, but there are three common themes for why people make this lifestyle switch.

  • One reason is to prevent animal cruelty and the exploitation of animals for food consumption and other general living needs. Every year, 56 billion farm animals are culled for their meat and this doesn’t include seafood and the many millions more that are culled or abused for their eggs, milk, skin, fur, feathers and more. By switching to a vegan lifestyle, each person can save up to 198 animals from being bred for food or accessories each year, which equates to around 1.4 billion animals per year in America alone that aren't bred for human benefit.
  • Another reason for becoming vegan is the environmental impact. The impact that large scale animal agriculture and fishing is having on our climate, oceans and land is now being well documented. The land required to grow grains to feed the livestock industry is responsible for the destruction of many of our rain forests. Imagine what could be achieved with livestock land if the demand for meat was simply not there? The methane and carbon dioxide emissions from the livestock industry is also higher than all of the car and transport emissions put together. These emissions are impacting our atmosphere and leading to climate change issues. Instead of switching to water saving shower heads or riding to work, you could eat vegan for two nights a week and have a larger impact. By adopting a vegan lifestyle, a more sustainable approach to living and land use can be achieved.
  • A third reason for becoming vegan is for health reasons. There is well documented evidence of the benefits of adopting a plant based diet for overall well being. A plant based diet reduces the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular issues, and is linked to longevity in countries who eat a mostly plant based diet. A plant based diet involves eating vegetables, fruits, grains, legumes and nuts without processed food or excessive oil.

Vegans may relate to one or more of the above reasons, or may have additional reasons for their lifestyle choice. However, the commonalities of vegans are the choices they make to avoid animal derived food & products and the exploitation of animals.

Don’t forget that I’m all natural, vegan and cruelty free so if you’re thinking of becoming vegan, then my skincare range is a great place to start! Click here to see my range of cleansers, body scrubs, moisturisers and more!

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